The premier destination for premium listings. Submit Your Listing Now

#Do More Go Explore

Five Strange Books

Five Strange Books

  • Posted: Sep 15, 2015
  • By:
  • Comments: Comments Off on Five Strange Books

Here are five of the World’s strangest written works which can be found in British institutions …

The Ripley Scroll

FROM THE RIPLEY SCROWLE
A section of the original Ripley Scroll that refers to the “Serpent of Arabia’. The traditional assumption is that this is code for “Aqua Fortis” or nitric acid but there may be another meaning! Very recent advances in modern medicine have begun to reveal that the alchemists, and Ripley in particular, may have known something as yet unexplored.

 

THE RIPLEY SCROLL

The British Museum
Sir George Ripley c. 1588 AD / English

The Ripley Scroll or “Ripley Scrowle” is one of the most important works (books) of Sir George Ripley an influential and renowned English alchemist of the 15th century. The life of Ripley is as mysterious as his legacy of mystical alchemical writings and illustrations but it is alleged that he studied in Rome and may have been an agent of the Papacy during this time with connections to The Knights of St. John of Jerusalem otherwise known as the Knights Hospitaller. During his latter life he returned to England where he produced most of his recognised works on alchemy. It is interesting to note that a Papal Decree of 1317 had forbidden the study into and publishing of alchemical texts and particularly forbade “clerics” from pursuing this subject and yet a little over a hundred years later Ripley, a clear favourite of Pope Innocent VIII seems to have dedicated his life to the pursuit of this science. The Ripley Scroll has been interpreted in many ways but still remains a mystery. Most scholars believe that the Ripley Scroll is the “recipe” for immortality but there are those that believe researchers have missed some crucial evidence. Many researchers feel this mystery needs to be examined in much more depth .Perhaps Ripley may have known much much more than seems obvious.

Continue reading

Funny Place Names

Funny Place Names

  • Posted: Sep 14, 2015
  • By:
  • Comments: Comments Off on Funny Place Names

Britain is well known for its funny place names. Many a tourist has arrived at a sleepy British village only to be greeted with a sign saying something that may appear quite unusual. One of the best was a sign saying ‘Welcome to Shitterton – Please Pass Slowly’. Of course, most of the names on this list once had completely innocent or acceptable meanings but as the English (American) language has changed they’ve assumed a whole new meaning. For example, ‘Ass House Lane’ was named after the place where a farmer once kept his donkeys and Nutter Lane probably had more to do with acorns than with mad people.

Continue reading

Where is London Bridge?

Where is London Bridge?

  • Posted: Sep 14, 2015
  • By:
  • Comments: Comments Off on Where is London Bridge?

How to Find London Bridge: London Bridge refers to many historical bridges that have spanned the River Thames between the City of London and Southwark, in central London. The current bridge was opened in 1973 and is a box-girder structure built from concrete and steel. This replaced a 19th-century stone-arched bridge, which in turn superseded a 600-year-old medieval structure. A series of earlier bridges were built an replaced over the centuries dating back to when the Romans established London around 2000 years ago. The current bridge stands at the western end of the Pool of London but is located some 30 metres (98 ft) upstream from the earlier constructions.

Continue reading

Best of British

Best of British

  • Posted: Sep 14, 2015
  • By:
  • Comments: Comments Off on Best of British

This is Britain Explorer’s list of the Best of British. Each winner was chosen based on a wide range of criteria. In the case of destinations, factors such as number of visitors, internet popularity and longevity were considered. Where the ‘Best of British’ is a person, their accomplishments and place in popular awareness were measured as was their contribution to their field of expertise, defence of the nation and the advancement of British culture. However, these are ultimately our choices and based on our opinions. This is not an ‘official’ list and, naturally, we’re sure that people will both agree and disagree with our choices. Feel free to tell us if you think you know of a better candidate and why.

Continue reading

Actors Who Played James Bond

Actors Who Played James Bond

  • Posted: Sep 14, 2015
  • By:
  • Comments: Comments Off on Actors Who Played James Bond

Connery was the first actor to play James Bond in a full length feature film based on the novels by Ian Fleming and he took the world by storm. The movie “Dr No” may seem a little dated in today’s era of computer-generated special effects but in 1962 the scale and glamour of the production was literally jaw dropping.

James Bond - SEAN CONNERY

Continue reading

Top Ten Lost Treasures of the World

Top Ten Lost Treasures of the World

  • Posted: Sep 14, 2015
  • By:
  • Comments: Comments Off on Top Ten Lost Treasures of the World
Jing John's Lost Treasure

£70,000,000

Treasure:
King John’s Jewels and Gold
Lost:
1216
Estimated Value:
$70,000,000
Contents:
Crown jewels, gold goblets, silver plate, golden wand with a dove, the sword of Tristram, gold coins.
Location:
Great Britain / The United Kingdom

King John’s Treasure

King John ‘the Bad’ was particularly fond of collecting (stealing) jewellery and gold plate for himself and coinage for his guards, soldiers and court followers. In 1216 King John travelled to Bishops Lynn in Norfolk where he arrived on the 9th October. The area is aptly named The Wash as it was once a huge expanses of marshes and dangerous mud flats. At Bishop’s Lynn King John fell ill with dysentery and decided to return to Newark Castle via Wisbech. He took the slower and safer route around The Wash. However, his soldiers and carts full of his personal possessions, including the crown jewels he had inherited from his grandmother the Empress of Germany, took the shorter route through the marshes.

Trapped by the tide they were drowned – possibly close to Sutton Bridge. The treasure carts were lost and never recovered. King John died a few days later on the 18th October 1216. What really happened is probably much more complex.

Continue reading

Ten Strange UK Houses

Ten Strange UK Houses

  • Posted: Sep 14, 2015
  • By:
  • Comments: Comments Off on Ten Strange UK Houses

Britain has some truly unusual houses, each with ability to make a passerby stop and wonder if what they are seeing is actually real. Some were built to inspire wonder while others were simply created as a process of history. These strange houses are just a few of the weird and wonderful homes that can be found in the United Kingdom.

The Traffic Island House – Stanton Drew

The traffic Island House

Google Earth Coordinates:
51°22’12.59″N 2°34’51.87″W

At the northern entrance to the village of Stanton Drew, and just before the bridge over the River Chew, is a white thatched, fifteenth-century cottage which was used as a turnpike toll house during the eighteenth century. It is a Grade II listed building and is located on a small triangular traffic-island at a T-junction. Although it’s known as the Round House, it is actually hexagonal and designed in the Picturesque Gothic style. It features a pointed arched door as well as a pointed arched casement with leaded lights. The apex of the thatched roof has a moulding that may represent the cup of an acorn. It was occupied as recently as 2012 and has a shield constructed to protect the front of the property.

Continue reading

Harvington Hall Priest Hides

Harvington Hall Priest Hides

  • Posted: Sep 14, 2015
  • By:
  • Comments: Comments Off on Harvington Hall Priest Hides

Harvington Hall is an Elizabethan manor house built on a triangular island bordered by a moat on two sides and a lake to the north. It was originally constructed by a devote Catholic, Humphrey Packington, during the 1580’s on the site once occupied by an earlier medieval hall. Located between the towns of Bromsgrove and Kidderminster in Worcestershire, it is now owned by the Catholic Archdiocese of Birmingham.

Harvington Hall is renowned for its secret chambers that were once used to hide priests during a time in British history when it was ruled illegal to practice Catholicism. Both priest and worshippers who were discovered by the so called ‘Pursuivants” (agents) of Queen Elizabeth I, were likely to face confiscation of their lands, torture, imprisonment and even execution. Harvington Hall is recognised as having some of the best surviving examples of these ‘priest holes’ in Britain. So well hidden were these secret rooms that no priest was ever discovered.

Continue reading

Ten Strange Places

Ten Strange Places

  • Posted: Sep 14, 2015
  • By:
  • Comments: Comments Off on Ten Strange Places

Here is the top ten list of curious and strange places from around the World. From ever mystical Stonehenge to the Moving Stones of Racetrack player these peculiar destinations will intrigue and inspire you.

STONEHENGE – GREAT BRITAIN

Strange Places - Stonehenge

STONEHENGE LATE IN THE AFTERNOON
Google Earth Coordinates:
51°10’43.97″N 1°49’34.24″W

Stonehenge is the UK’s most important ancient monument and has been throughout history. It’s one of Britain’s most important tourist destinations and attracts about 900,000 visitors every year. It was visited by Romans stationed in the region and a Saxon burial on the site confirms that it was seen as a place of religious significance during both the dark and middle ages. The earliest known written reference appears in 937 AD with regard to a land deed from King Athelstan to Wilton Abbey which refers to ‘Stanheyeg’. It’s near impossible to imagine how Neolithic people managed to build it and rearrange it several times over the millennia. It’s important to pagans and druids as a religious site and is at the centre of the British crop-circle phenomenon. Some archaeologists believe it was a temple while others believe that it represented a doorway into the afterlife.

Stonehenge is at the heart of an ancient stone-age complex that is far larger than the monument that can still be seen today.

Continue reading

Top Ten UFO Sightings (UK 1980 – 2013)

Top Ten UFO Sightings (UK 1980 – 2013)

  • Posted: Sep 14, 2015
  • By:
  • Comments: Comments Off on Top Ten UFO Sightings (UK 1980 – 2013)
Continued from page one Sightings of UFO in the UK have remained constant over the past several decades and the MOD (Ministry of Defence) has investigated a fair number of these over the years. In 2012 more than 7,000 pages of information were released to the public as part of the Freedom of Information Act. There is even a section entitled: (Prime Minister) Tony Blair’s Briefing and the Flying Saucer Working Party (DEFE 24 1987 1). Here are some of the best sightings:.

Rendlesham Forest UFO: 1980

ufo-rendlesham-forestThe Rendlesham Forest Incident is the most famous, and well documented, of all UK UFO episodes. It is often referred to as the British version of ‘Roswell’ and took place during the nights of the 24th, 25th and 26th December 1980. The encounter occurred in the forested area adjacent to the military bases of RAF Bentwaters and RAF Woodbridge in Suffolk England. At the time of the incident both bases were being used by the United States Air Force (USAF). At approximately 03:00am on 26 December 1980 dozens of soldiers observed a number of unusual lights falling slowly into an area of the nearby forest to the east of RAF Woodbridge. A patrol was sent to investigate and discovered a metallic object that was illuminated with coloured lights. As they approached the craft it moved away through the trees. Nearby farm animals appeared very disturbed and made frantic noises. The site was revisited the following day and three impressions in the ground were discovered where the craft had originally been located. The following night additional lights were observed in the area and were even witnessed by the Deputy Base Commander Colonel Charles Halt.

Continue reading

Page 4 of 6« First...23456
Were there Once Sharks in the UK
Can Bumblebees Solve Crimes